Quizzing and random question selector

UPDATE 8/10/17 A 10-question version is available here:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7zWJOPvqqlCMDhWVXAyNmVtTnM/view?usp=sharing 

A great resource from https://dave2004b.wordpress.com/author/dave2004b/ that allows you to upload information and generate quizzes to aid memory recall.

 

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B7zWJOPvqqlCanNFQkJyQWFid0U

Advertisements

Research in 100 words – simple guide for busy teachers!

Research in 100 words

Attachment-1

Simple summaries for busy teachers.

In the staff room, by the photocopier, on the back of the toilet door!

I hope that you find them useful – credit to Chris Moyse

NEW RESEARCH SUMMARIES:

Common Myths:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/u3764f3re8avucx/slic100%20Common%20myths.pdf?dl=0

Elaborative interrogation:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/7qfoavblv4of8hm/slic100%20elaborative%20interrogation.pdf?dl=0

Mindset:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/97zw8rc44650r43/slic100%20mindset.pdf?dl=0

Using data:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ro220dki8ry4l7e/slic100%20Using%20data.pdf?dl=0

Working memory:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/3l06up6pflkwhl0/slic100%20working%20memory.pdf?dl=0

Ability groupings:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/fy8a4mzay6yy4r7/slic100%20Ability%20grouping.pdf?dl=0

Self regulation:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/kn02t76szmjv9co/slic100%20self%20regulation.pdf?dl=0

ORIGINAL RESEARCH SUMMARIES

 Ask questions:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/d5baa25vngqbv0j/slic100%20ask%20questions.pdf?dl=0

Check understanding:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/yxhl556iq68mo1s/slic100%20check%20for%20understanding.pdf?dl=0

Cognitive load:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/587zgdcza2ejel8/slic100%20cognitive%20load.pdf?dl=0

Daily review:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/1a2ayvjyt210zx1/slic100%20daily%20review.pdf?dl=0

Pair words with graphics:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/9fdxqjpbnya3stc/slic100%20pair%20words%20with%20graphics.pdf?dl=0

Independent practice:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/htd0f9798laqx2t/slic100%20practice.pdf?dl=0

Provide models:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/f7z3e9o0qaimvit/slic100%20provide%20models.pdf?dl=0

Scaffolds for difficult tasks:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/h1q8q7hy08szplu/slic100%20scaffolds.pdf?dl=0

Present material in small steps:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/879xa1mols39825/slic100%20small%20steps.pdf?dl=0

Retrieval practice:                                   https://www.dropbox.com/s/1w33urtx6030s9s/slic100%20retrieval%20practice.pdf?dl=0

Alternating solved and unsolved problems:  https://www.dropbox.com/s/y9r4dn9ohws6wng/slic100%20alternating%20solved%20and%20unsolved.pdf?dl=0

Beliefs about intelligence:                 https://www.dropbox.com/s/n5f1wbbm7ogtegi/Beliefs%20about%20intelligence.pdf?dl=0

Know facts:                                                      https://www.dropbox.com/s/37gohawyj695shq/slic100%20know%20facts.pdf?dl=0

What they already know:                             https://www.dropbox.com/s/q2wf8gy8zcjgh5d/slic100%20what%20they%20already%20know.pdf?dl=0

Feedback:                                                   https://www.dropbox.com/s/fey8p4lfkiugzkb/slic100%20feedback.pdf?dl=0

100

 

New report on Cognitive Load Theory aimed at teachers (CLT).

By Greg Ashman:

I have been researching Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) for a couple of years now. During that time, I’ve blogged about CLT and I’ve often been asked if there is a teacher-friendly summary of the theory available.

Today, such a summary has been released by the New South Wales Centre for Education and Statistics (CESE with handle @nswcese on Twitter). It’s a pretty good take on CLT. John Sweller has read it and thinks they’ve managed to capture the essence of the theory pretty well.

The CESE paper looks at the principles of CLT and the main findings as they apply to teaching, including a brief description of the different ‘effects’ that have been noted. It also has a helpful section on criticisms and limitations (CLT is the subject of ongoing research). I strongly recommend the CESE paper to any teachers who are starting to dip their toes in the water.

It’s pleasing to see the number of popular descriptions of CLT increase in recent times. There are my own blog posts, of course, as well as a piece I wrote for The Conversation. In addition, we now have an interesting paper by Sweller that covers similar ground to the CESE paper while placing it in a chronology of how CLT developed. And thanks to the researchED movement, we also have a video of Sweller explaining the key ideas.

However, the best resource for those who want a complete picture of CLT is still a rather expensive book. Hopefully, in time, we will also have a popular version of this.

‘Four Quarters Marking – a workload solution?

September 2, 2017 by Carl Hendrick

In our new book ‘What Does This Look Like in the Classroom?’ we interviewed Dylan Wiliam on how to implement research on assessment in the classroom.  

 

A central problem in the area of assessment in the classroom has been in the way we often confuse marking and feedback. As Dylan Wiliam points out in our discussion, there is an extraordinary amount of energy expended by teachers on marking and often very little to show for it in the way of student benefit. Although feedback is one of the most effective drivers of learning, one of the more surprising findings is that a lot of it actually has a negative effect on student achievement.

A set of marked books is traditionally seen as an effective proxy for good teaching but there is a lot of evidence to say that this might not always be the case. This problem is on a scale that might surprise a lot of people:

Dylan: I once estimated that, if you price teacher’s time appropriately, in England we spend about two and a half billion pounds a year on feedback and it has almost no effect on student achievement.

Certainly students need to know where they make misconceptions or spelling errors and correcting those is important. Doing so also provides a useful diagnostic for teachers to inform what they will teach next, but the written comments at the end of a piece of work are often both the most time-consuming and also the most ineffective. For example, taking the following typical comments on a GCSE English essay:

  •        Try to phrase your analysis of language using more sophisticated vocabulary and phrasing.
  •        Try to expand on your points with more complex analysis of Macbeth’s character.

This is a good example of certain assessment practices where the feedback mainly focuses on what was deficient about it, which as Douglas Reeve’s notes, is “more like a post-mortem than a medical.” The other thing is that it doesn’t really tell the student what they need to do to improve. What is more useful to the student here? receiving vague comments like these or actually seeing sophisticated vocabulary, phrasing and analysis in action? It’s very difficult to be excellent if you don’t know what excellent looks like.

Often, teachers give both a grade and comments like those above to students, hoping that they somehow improve by the time their next piece of writing comes around a week later and then berate the student when, lo and behold, they make the same mistakes again. Perhaps part of the problem here is that we have very low expectations of what students are willing to do in response to a piece of work and do not afford them the opportunity to engage in the kind of tasks that might really improve their learning.

To address this problem, Dylan advocates a much more streamlined model of marking that is not only more manageable for teachers, but also allows students to have more ownership over the process:

Dylan: I recommend what I call ‘four quarters marking.’ I think that teachers should mark in detail, 25% of what students do, should skim another 25%, students should then self-assess about 25% with teachers monitoring the quality of that and finally, peer assessment should be the other 25%. It’s a sort of balanced diet of different kinds of marking and assessment.

4 corner marking

After producing a piece of work, instead of using abstract skills based success criteria, it is probably more powerful for students to have access to a bank of exemplar essays or worked solutions to see concrete examples of success against which to self-assess their own work. Marking everything in sight and leaving detailed comments is an established cultural norm now but this practice doesn’t appear to be based on good evidence. We know for example that many students will look at a grade and not engage with the feedback but is that feedback always useful anyway?

As we discuss in the book, a common issue we see again and again in using research in the classroom is the ‘Chinese whisper effect’ where by the time evidence works its way down to the level of the classroom, it’s a pale imitation of its original form. This is especially prevalent in the area of marking where convoluted policies such as triple marking are enacted as a means of raising pupil achievement whereas all they are doing is often increasing teacher workload. As Dylan Wiliam reminds us, “feedback should be more work for the recipient than the donor,” but how do you change a culture that has traditionally been the opposite?

Dylan: In terms of what we do about this, I would say first of all, headteachers should lay down clear expectation to parents and say things like, “We are not going to give detailed feedback on more than 25% of what your child does. The reason for that is not because we’re lazy. It’s because there are better uses we could make of that time. We could mark everything your child does, but that would lead to lower quality teaching and then your child will learn less.”  Heads have to establish those cultural norms. If a teacher is marking everything your child does, it’s bad teaching. It is using time in a way that does not have the greatest benefit for students.

As a profession, we are too some extent, we are our own worst enemy. Using marking policies that have little impact on student achievement and a negative impact on teacher workload and morale makes little sense. By adopting an approach like four quarters marking, we might go some way to address this issue and at the same time, give students more ownership over their own learning.

‘What Does This Look Like in the Classroom?’ is out later this month. 

 

 

 

 

Marking – something needs to change!

A great blog post from Tom Bennett – thoughts to me please. Tim.

Saturday, 15 October 2016

It’s your time you’re wasting; why schools should stop drowning teachers in marking

Of course, it’s optional
One does not simply walk into Mordor, and one does not simply pop into IKEA for a packet of napkins and an Ottoman. The Scandinavian elves play a voodoo on your flimsy aspirations of frugality, and by the time you’re supping on a hot dog in the car park of Valhalla you’re dragging a caravan of Billy bookcases, tea candles, picture frames and a rug that doubles as a shoe tidy. And you forgot the Ottoman.

We’ve all done it; started out with one plan and ended up with another. That’s fine when Plan B is also something you want (cf: Professor Mickey Flanagan’s seminal  ‘Out/ OUT-out theory of organic incremental decision decay’ for details). But not if you put your hand in your pocket for a Swiss knife and pull out a Swiss roll. And not if you planned on teaching kids, but ended up doing something else that looked a bit like teaching, but wasn’t really.

I was reminded of this recently when I heard of a colleague’s experience in a struggling school in the Midlands. The school was staring down the barrel of Special Measures; its previous visit from MiniLearn saw their pockets picked of their previous Good rating, downgraded to RI. Alarms bells they no longer knew they possessed blew like Louis and the walls came tumbling down. Action Stations. Dust blew off the Burgundy book. Steam Engine Time. Something must be done was the whole of the law.

But what? Sadly, the answer was ‘triple marking’, because as we know, nothing animates and activates deep, deep learning like spending all day on one piece of work, endlessly batted between the teacher and the taught in a show trial of pedagogy, with as much measurable impact on progress as a fruit fly trying to push the Moon out its orbit. And homework; reams and reams of it, marked to a metronome in a fool’s rubric. Never mind that this simple edict suddenly took up around a third of the teacher’s total- not free- time. That’ s gross, not net. Imagine if I said to you that a third of your career would now be spent, not teaching, or having meaningful conversations with students, or reading up on your subject, but flicking, ticking and wondering when Morpheus was going to show up so you could scarf both pills.

At a previous school I taught humanities to 10 or 11 classes of approximately 25 kids apiece. So let’s say 250 pupils. Then they announced the expectation was weekly homework set, with marking. Even a speedy romp with a red pen would easily see that converted into 250 minutes per week- if all I did was turn the pages and make a mark to say ‘I was here.’ Anything more than that meant 5 minutes a book, or 1250 minutes. A sixth form essay with comments? Christ, you need a Tardis and a magic lamp to get that polished off

Not waving, but marking

250 pupils flick and tick- 250 minutes, or 4 hours 10 minutes
250 pupils flick and an end comment- 500 minutes, or 8 hours, 20 minutes
250 pupils with substantive comments- 1250 minutes, or 20 hours and 50 minutes
250 pupils with substantive comments and spelling/ grammar correction- haha you’re kidding mate who do you think I am, Ali Bongo?

And I’ve seen teachers try to match this, because schools ask them to. Bye-bye weekend and every evening and your marbles.

All that time has to come from either you, or the students. Now the standard response from anyone foolish enough to demand this in the first place, is ‘Set homework that doesn’t need much marking; or can be marked by peers.’ And I would agree, which is why we now see rainbows of pen colours indicating ‘marked by a peer/ marked by myself/ marked by a unicorn with a lisp’ etc. Problem solved? No, problem shifted, because that kind of marking doesn’t really show progress, or the Holy Grail of book marking: progress as a result of teacher intervention. So, you have no option but to triple, quadruple, octuple mark, or devise tortuous exercises where children fill out sheets designed to capture comments like ‘I now understand this activity because…..and I have achieved this by….’ Ghastly.

I have a simple attitude towards time management in an enclosed system: the investment has to be worth the dividend. If I’m asked to spend a third of my time on activity x then I expect that activity x should account for an equivalent third of their learning. In a school, opportunity cost is all; if we’re doing one thing, we’re prevented from doing another. And time, like land, is the one thing they aren’t making any more of. Triple marking simply doesn’t produce anything like a result that can match its cost. In fact, I’ll argue that most homework has the same problem, especially if it entails marking.

‘Just a couple more sets to mark lads!’

Three are many other displacement activities we could do without: poem tasks when the subject isn’t poetry; art and design tasks when we’re studying religious food laws; colouring in; making volcanos.; puppet shows and role plays. I know many teachers are prepared to fight to their last breath defending these things, and they may at times have merit as pace-regulators or pauses between content. But too often they represent a disproportionate investment of time in a system where time is a treasure chest. And when workload is the lash, the goad and the rack of possibility, spending each second wisely is no longer a luxury.

These damnable chronophages are designed to make teachers  prance on command for fear of a real or imagined Grendel. I once wrote that the best thing to do on the day of an Ofsted inspection was to get your Free School Meal kids to perform ‘Consider Yourself’ from Oliver! With their target grades painted on flat caps. I didn’t know that in a few years reality would render my satire useless.

Mungo just pawn in great game of life

Just as teachers wind up- if their nerve isn’t strong or their hearts true and pure- teaching to the test rather than teaching brilliantly and letting the test discover it, schools can easily fall into a pit where the appearance of progress becomes more important than the progress itself. I see many, many schools where the directed activity of the teacher has nothing to do with actual learning, and everything to do with showboating. There’s a wonderful scene in Mel Brooks’s genre opus Blazing Saddles where the Sheriff and the Waco Kid animate a moribund citizenry of beleaguered settlers to stand up to a pack of desperadoes by building a fake town for them to plunder instead. I think this is how many schools approach an inspection; see our beautiful data and our books of interventions and can we interest you in a jelly baby? Look how we’ve grown since last we spoke!

Enough. Enough. Ofsted have been quite clear that they don’t require any particular scheme of marking, any preferred assessment regime, any particular liturgy of when, how often and how books are marked. There is no activity or strategy or teaching style beloved or scorned to which teachers should aspire. Wilshaw, the present Prospero of Ofsted, is quite clear on this. And yes, I understand why schools do this. In desperation, a rat will chew through it’s leg to escape a trap, and dogs will bark at cars. But that shouldn’t be policy. The inspection regime is partly responsible for this of course. But if we ever want to be seen as a profession and not an army of complainants, it’s time we took action at a level we can affect.

We’ve found so many lovely ways to fill our time that we’ve forgotten what we came to do. The tragedy is that sometimes we can forget there ever was anything else we did, and the tragedy squared is when kids start to think like that too.

20 ways to widen the ‘gap’ in your classroom!

A great post from Miss Cox – link to her site is below. I hope we don’t do any of these!

IMG_2779

  1. Make homework optional
  2. Create resources for different levels/grades of students
  3. Only teach certain groups of students the tough stuff
  4. Take under achieving students out of one subject to catch up with other subjects
  5. Allow absence without any action
  6. Don’t make students catch up with work when absent
  7. Make judgments/decisions using student data/hearsay, before you’ve met them & seen what they can do
  8. Treat PP/LAC students differently (marking their books first won’t close a gap)
  9. Think that an SEN student cannot learn the same and in the same way as non-SEN (in the majority of cases)
  10. Don’t check students’ work regularly and hold them to account for incomplete/unsatisfactory standard or work/presentation
  11. Use marks/grades/levels on student work
  12. Talk about attainment instead of improvement
  13. Leave a piece of work unimproved by the student
  14. Tell them they’re weak/lesser/in a bottom set
  15. Assume they know how and what to learn
  16. Assume that if you’ve said something once, it’s enough
  17. Have discussions about groups of children instead of individuals
  18. Don’t follow through things you say you will do with students
  19. Don’t follow school systems with a student/s because they’re a ‘special case’
  20. Don’t ever contact home or involve them in the student’s learning.